Kef Kc62 Subwoofer Review: Best Choice For You

Kef Kc62 Subwoofer Review: Best Choice For You

If you’re in the market for a new subwoofer, you should consider these new KEF KCA62 Subwoofers. Unlike other subs, these new subs have a built-in amplifier that handles low frequencies with ease, for high levels of power with great noise control. Keep reading KEF KC62 Subwoofer Review to get more information about this outstanding product.

KEF KC62 Subwoofer Review

Kef Kc62 Subwoofer

  • Type: Active subwoofer
  • Woofer: 2 x 165 mm
  • Amplifier: 2 x 500 W class D
  • Frequency range: 11-200 Hz
  • Dimensions and weight: 246 x 256 x 248 mm/14 kg
  • Finish: Carbon black/mineral white
  • Other: Wireless audio via adapter (KEF KW1)

Pros

  • KEF KC62 subwoofer is small and easy to place. It has a deep, precise bass that is proportional to its size. A perfect partner for the LS50 speakers.

Cons

  • Even a powerful sub like the KC62 is not perfect. If you want to play louder or have a larger listening room, there are subwoofers that can be even more powerful.

This tiny bass cube is only 25x25x25cms, and it’s actually smaller than a regular compact speaker. KEF claims they can achieve deep bass as low as 11 Hz. They had to think again in order to achieve this.

It is difficult to fit two active woofers into such a small cabinet. Engineers have found a clever way to make it work. They have allowed the two active woofers to share the same magnet system. This means that one element’s voice coil is placed on top of the other. KEF calls this technology “UniCore“.

This has a number of benefits, such as the fact that the woofers push each other in the opposite direction and reduce unwanted resonances. Two active woofers, driven by two 500-watt amplifiers, provide significantly higher sound pressure than an active-passive variant. This results in a deeper, more powerful, and cleaner sounding deep bass.

The KC62 includes line-level (RCA) and speaker-level inputs (Phoenix connector) and a variable (40Hz-60Hz) high-pass filter (HPF) line-level (RCA) output. The main speakers can then be driven directly (full range) or the KC62 via line-level inputs, outputs, and roll off the low-end to blend with the sub.

Four panel-mounted DIP switches allow you to set the high-pass turnover frequencies between 40Hz and120Hz (or bypass) Matching, calibrated knobs can be used to adjust the woofer’s output and low-pass turnover frequencies. A phase-inversion switch (0deg/180deg) and an expansion port accept KEF’s optional KW1 wireless adapter ($200) are also available.

The KC62’s bipole radiations can double the radiating area of a single woofer without requiring a larger box. According to KEF’s website, the KC62’s magnetically unified drivers employ a current-sensing feedback loop that counteracts voice-coil nonlinearities, “distortion reducing” P-Flex folded-cone-surrounds, and a variation on their new, much-discussed Meta-material Absorption Technology.

The KC62 is available in Carbon Black or Mineral White, both with matte finishes, just like the LS50 Metas from KEF.

User-friendly Bass With (partial) App Control

Bass With (partial) App Control

KEF KC62 can be used in almost any sound system. However, it is well-suited for use with the LS50 models. You can connect it to the speakers using a standard RCA signal cable or speaker cables from the amplifier via a small and awkward adapter. KEF offers a USB dongle KW1 for wireless connections. This is the most flexible option, as you can place the subwoofer almost anywhere.

The KEF KC62 is a dual 6.5” driver subwoofer in a tiny cube around 10” on each side that makes your bookshelf speakers sound like a full-range system.

If you use the KC62 with the LS50 Wireless, there are additional benefits. KEF Connect is an app that allows you to tune and optimize your sound. You can adjust the crossover frequency and bass level, as well as save your EQ settings. The app also lets you decide when the subwoofer should take over and roll off.

The app doesn’t allow you to remotely manage the sub’s manual settings. You will still need to adjust the settings on the back.

The app will automatically choose the best settings if you indicate that you are connecting a KC62. You can also add a subwoofer to each speaker or run stereo bass.

Sound Quality

KEF is open about the fact that the KC62 was designed to work well with the LS50 Wireless II. We trusted them and used them in conjunction with our test. We began listening to the KEFs without a subwoofer. However, we know from experience that they thrive close to the back wall (approximately 50 cm) so that they can receive a little boost of bass from the surrounding. They sound great in these conditions and can play a large variety of music.

However, it quickly becomes apparent that they lack weight in the lower octaves. They sound very slim when they are pulled out from the floor. Although they have a better soundscape and focus, they also lose the bass. A subwoofer can be added to make the deepest bass sound. This allows you more freedom in positioning the speakers and creates a larger sound image.

Naturally, we were excited by how KEF managed to integrate and time the LS50 speakers. It works! The bass projections are perfectly matched with the speaker’s bass reproduction. It doesn’t sound like we have connected any subwoofers. The LS50 speakers sound several times larger!

The KEF sub was challenged with long, challenging, bass-heavy music. We were impressed at how much bass it managed to squeeze out. It seems solid. The cabinet boom is solid even when the elements are vibrating at maximum speed.

A good bass will make even the most groovy tracks, such as Lemonade, more engaging and entertaining. This is also true for the deep, rhythmic synth-bass that DeadMau5 has used to create some of their best songs. Double bass and acoustic guitar are also available.

A subwoofer can make the bass sound even better. You can see the improvements in the midrange. The soundscape becomes larger and instruments have a better anchorage. The music is more synchronized and has a greater presence and size. This brings us closer to the real feeling of live music!

You can expect to gain more weight if you use the KEF LS50 for TV speakers via the HDMI input. This solution was tested with a Samsung TV. The movie sound is as expected much more powerful when a subwoofer is added to the bottom.

A separate sub reproduces very low frequencies, so the main speaker doesn’t have to produce deep bass. This could affect midrange/treble clarity from transmitted vibration. This ensures that the overall sound is cleaner and more natural.

Read also: Where To Put Subwoofer In Room? Top Full Guide 2022

kef subwoofer kc62 review

Setup

The KC62 could inspire the word “cute” if not for its denseness– it is three times heavier than the bowling ball it immediately recalls. It is beautifully finished with great attention to detail, textures, and tones, just like every KEF product that I have encountered. Two sides culminate in the opposing driver cones, while the bottom surface has a footing of some vibration-absorbing, woofer-walk-resisting stuff.

The back panel houses a complex control panel and input/output panel. It has the usual, but unusually well-detailed, crossover and rotary volume knobs, 0/180 degree phase, and LFE/Normal toggles as well as a five-position EQ switch with Wall, Corner, and Room settings. Cabinet and Apartment are two additional settings that limit vibrational transmission and deep bass output.

A four-place “DIP” switch set can impose a high pass filter on the KC62’s stereo line outputs. This is useful for systems without a crossover facility in their amps or receivers.

Limited Sound Pressure

Limited Sound Pressure

We had to verify that the bass response was as deep as KEF claims. The KC62 does indeed provide a tactile/audible response of just 11 Hz. This tiny sub has a powerful thrust and a low sound level of 25 Hz. It made the recording sound more holographic and dimensional and gave the bass more attack and weight. Although it’s not always the case that the foundation wall cracks or is visible in the floorboards, it can be felt!

All good things have a price. A small subwoofer likes this has certain limitations when compared to a full-size model. KEF’s engineers may be smart, but they cannot change the physical laws. The amplifier then compensates by lowering the level when the drivers are too small for the task. It all depends on what you like, how much space you have, and your relationship with neighbors.

The KEF subwoofer was also tested in conjunction with two larger, hi-fi floor standing speakers (Sonus Faber Olympica III). These speakers have a deeper bass than the LS50s and don’t require as much “traction” from a subwoofer. The KC62 also made a significant difference, but it could not keep up with very high listening levels. This is where a larger subwoofer or an additional KC62 will be helpful.

Conclusion

The KEF KC62 subwoofer is a compact, powerful subwoofer with audiophile-grade sound reproduction. Packed with space-saving features that are rarely found in affordable subwoofers, this subwoofer is an excellent choice for any sound system.

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